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Marios Mouratidis, M.Sc.

Friederike_Breuer
Marios.Mouratidis(at)uni-siegen.de

 

Raum: US-D 103

Telefon: +49 (0) 271/ 740 – 4535

Vita

Marios Mouratidis studierte Literary, Cultural and Media Studies mit Language and Communcation im Nebenfach (B.A.) und Human Computer-Interaction (M.Sc.) an der Universität Siegen. Seit anfang 2020 ist er wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Lehrstuhl CSCW und soziale Medien in dem von EU und Land NRW geförderten Zentrum für Smart Production Design.
Sein Forschungsinteresse liegt im Bereich Partizipation, Maker Methodologien, digitale Fabrikation, Innovation und come_IN Computer Clubs, unter anderem in Palästina. Er verfolgt qualitative Forschungsansätze.
Während seines Studiums konnte er sich als studentischer Mitarbeiter in verschiedenste Forschungsprojekte der Lehrstühle Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neue Medien und CSCW und Soziale Medien einbringen.
Ab 2016 fokussierte er seine Arbeit auf Feldforschung in Palästina und koordinierte das DAAD geförderte Projekt YALLAH! You All Are Hackers , wo er Studierende in kleinen Forschungsprojekten rund um soziale Innovation betreute und qualitative Forschungsmethoden für empirisch basiertes Design vermittelt hat. Er koordiniert seitdem die Forschungsvorhaben des Lehrstuhls Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neue Medien in Palästina und arbeitete außerdem im BMBF geförderten Projekt PiHub und im EU geförderten Projekt Fostering Entrepreneurship in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (FESTEM). Mit seiner Masterarbeit “(Un-)Sustainable ICT-interventions in occupied Palestine” verfasste er eine Fallstudie in der er aus 9 Jahren Forschungsdaten um come_IN Computer Clubs in Pälistina resümiert und Faktoren für nachhaltige IKT-zentrierte Communities untersucht hat. Vor und während seinem Studium hat er Freiberuflich im Bereich Medien Design (Web, Print, Mobil) und Game Design gearbeitet.


Projekte

SMaP (EFRE, 2018- heute)
Fab Lab Siegen
FESTEM (2018-heute)
PiHUB (2019)
YALLAH You All Are Hackers (DAAD, 2016-2018)
come_IN – Interkulturelles Lernen mittels computergestützter Projektarbeit

Publikationen

2020


  • Rüller, S., Aal, K., Mouratidis, M. & Wulf, V. (2020)Messy Fieldwork: A Natural Necessity or a Result of Western Origins and Perspectives?

    Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 185–190 doi:10.1145/3393914.3395864
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    With this Provocation, we aim at starting a dialogue between researchers who struggle with applying qualitative and ethnographic methods and following approaches in non-Western settings. Going by the book might not be an option when conducting research in politically charged or un-stable regions. Local politics, social pressure and even people’s personal safety are aspects that require consideration. Based on our experience from conducting fieldwork in Morocco, Palestine and Botswana, we reflect upon the difficulties we came across. We argue that, messiness, to some extent comes naturally with immersive fieldwork. On the other hand, in order to find ‘clean’ ways of conducting ethnographic fieldwork in non-Western contexts, novel forms of (applying) methods are needed. By providing questions regarding three different aspects (applying methods on the Ground, Ethics, and Participation) we encourage researchers to reflect upon their own experiences.
    @inproceedings{ruller_messy_2020,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{DIS}' 20 {Companion}},
    title = {Messy {Fieldwork}: {A} {Natural} {Necessity} or a {Result} of {Western} {Origins} and {Perspectives}?},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-7987-8},
    shorttitle = {Messy {Fieldwork}},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1145/3393914.3395864},
    doi = {10.1145/3393914.3395864},
    abstract = {With this Provocation, we aim at starting a dialogue between researchers who struggle with applying qualitative and ethnographic methods and following approaches in non-Western settings. Going by the book might not be an option when conducting research in politically charged or un-stable regions. Local politics, social pressure and even people's personal safety are aspects that require consideration. Based on our experience from conducting fieldwork in Morocco, Palestine and Botswana, we reflect upon the difficulties we came across. We argue that, messiness, to some extent comes naturally with immersive fieldwork. On the other hand, in order to find 'clean' ways of conducting ethnographic fieldwork in non-Western contexts, novel forms of (applying) methods are needed. By providing questions regarding three different aspects (applying methods on the Ground, Ethics, and Participation) we encourage researchers to reflect upon their own experiences.},
    urldate = {2021-04-15},
    booktitle = {Companion {Publication} of the 2020 {ACM} {Designing} {Interactive} {Systems} {Conference}},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Rüller, Sarah and Aal, Konstantin and Mouratidis, Marios and Wulf, Volker},
    month = jul,
    year = {2020},
    keywords = {participation, ethnography, ethics, fieldwork, global south, methods, non-western, western},
    pages = {185--190},
    }

  • Rueller, S., Aal, K., Mouratidis, M., Randall, D., Wulf, V., Boulus-Rødje, N. & Semaan, B. (2020)(Coping with) Messiness in Ethnography – Methods, Ethics and Participation in ethnographic Field Work in the non-Western World

    CHI EA ’21: Extended Abstracts of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, United States, Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, Pages: 1–5 doi:10.1145/3411763.3441328
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]
    There are several frameworks and approaches, addressing how to conduct ethnographic and qualitative field work in various settings. However, going by the book might not be an option when conducting research in politically charged, unstable or simply non-western regions. Politics, social pressure and even someone’s personal safety might be necessary to consider. Another important area to consider are research ethics. Privacy policies might do their work with regard to existing laws which differ from each country and should ensure no harm for all involved parties, but how can this be guaranteed and does it also cover all aspects of ethics? Including stakeholders as a basis for user-centered work and design is common. But what does participation mean in such contexts? The questions are: What is important to consider when conducting ethnographic field work in such settings? How can we foster different degrees of genuine participation? How can we ensure, that the work we do is ethically correct without endangering the research outcome? In this workshop, we invite researchers and practitioners to rethink existing methods and approaches and start working on guidelines, that better serves the needs of such specific and to some extent critical circumstances.
    @inproceedings{rueller_coping_2020,
    address = {New York, NY, United States},
    title = {({Coping} with) {Messiness} in {Ethnography} – {Methods}, {Ethics} and {Participation} in ethnographic {Field} {Work} in the non-{Western} {World}},
    url = {https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/3411763.3441328},
    doi = {10.1145/3411763.3441328},
    abstract = {There are several frameworks and approaches, addressing how to conduct ethnographic and qualitative field work in various settings. However, going by the book might not be an option when conducting research in politically charged, unstable or simply non-western regions. Politics, social pressure and even someone’s personal safety might be necessary to consider. Another important area to consider are research ethics. Privacy policies might do their work with regard to existing laws which differ from each country and should ensure no harm for all involved parties, but how can this be guaranteed and does
    it also cover all aspects of ethics? Including stakeholders as a basis for user-centered work and design is common. But what does participation mean in such contexts? The questions are: What is important to consider when conducting ethnographic field work in such settings? How can we foster different degrees of genuine participation? How can we ensure, that the work we do is ethically correct without endangering the research outcome? In this workshop, we invite researchers and practitioners to rethink existing methods and approaches and start working on guidelines, that better serves the needs of such specific and to some extent critical circumstances.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2021-04-19},
    booktitle = {{CHI} {EA} '21: {Extended} {Abstracts} of the 2021 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    author = {Rueller, Sarah and Aal, Konstantin and Mouratidis, Marios and Randall, Dave and Wulf, Volker and Boulus-Rødje, Nina and Semaan, Bryan},
    year = {2020},
    note = {Accepted: 2020-06-15T07:28:12Z
    Publisher: European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)},
    pages = {1--5},
    }

2019


  • Mouratidis, M. & Khatib, R. (2019)Why ethnography matters – the case of a Palestinian Refugee Camp

    With an Eye to the Future: HCI Research and Practice in the Arab World – Extended Abstracts of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 25–29 doi:10.1145/3290607.3299006
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @inproceedings{mouratidis_why_2019,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{CHI} {EA} '19},
    title = {Why ethnography matters – the case of a {Palestinian} {Refugee} {Camp}},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-5971-9},
    url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3290607.3299006},
    doi = {10.1145/3290607.3299006},
    booktitle = {With an {Eye} to the {Future}: {HCI} {Research} and {Practice} in the {Arab} {World} - {Extended} {Abstracts} of the 2019 {CHI} {Conference} on {Human} {Factors} in {Computing} {Systems}},
    publisher = {ACM},
    author = {Mouratidis, Marios and Khatib, Renad},
    year = {2019},
    pages = {25--29},
    }

2017


  • Weibert, A., Mouratidis, M., Khateb, R., Rüller, S., Hosak, M., Potka, S., Aal, K. & Wulf, V. (2017)Creating Environmental Awareness with Upcycling Making Activities: A Study of Children in Germany and Palestine

    Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Interaction Design and Children. New York, NY, USA, Publisher: ACM, Pages: 286–291 doi:10.1145/3078072.3079732
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @inproceedings{weibert_creating_2017,
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    series = {{IDC} '17},
    title = {Creating {Environmental} {Awareness} with {Upcycling} {Making} {Activities}: {A} {Study} of {Children} in {Germany} and {Palestine}},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-4921-5},
    url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3078072.3079732},
    doi = {10.1145/3078072.3079732},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2017 {Conference} on {Interaction} {Design} and {Children}},
    publisher = {ACM},
    author = {Weibert, Anne and Mouratidis, Marios and Khateb, Renad and Rüller, Sarah and Hosak, Miriam and Potka, Shpresa and Aal, Konstantin and Wulf, Volker},
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {yallah, computer club, children, environment, intercultural, learning, making, upcycling},
    pages = {286--291},
    }

2016


  • Aal, K., Mouratidis, M., Weibert, A. & Wulf, V. (2016)Challenges of CI Initiatives in a Political Unstable Situation -Case Study of a Computer Club in a Refugee Camp

    doi:10.1145/2957276.2996281
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]
    This poster describes the research around computer clubs in Palestinian refugee camps and the various lessons learned during the establishment of this intervention such the importance of the physical infrastructure (e.g. clean room, working hardware), soft technologies (e.g. knowledge transfer through workshops), social infrastructure (e.g. reliable partners in the refugee camp, partner from the university) and social capital (e.g. shared vision and values of all stakeholders). These important insights can be transferred on other interventions in similar unstable environments.
    @article{aal_challenges_2016,
    title = {Challenges of {CI} {Initiatives} in a {Political} {Unstable} {Situation} -{Case} {Study} of a {Computer} {Club} in a {Refugee} {Camp}},
    doi = {10.1145/2957276.2996281},
    abstract = {This poster describes the research around computer clubs in Palestinian refugee camps and the various lessons learned during the establishment of this intervention such the importance of the physical infrastructure (e.g. clean room, working hardware), soft technologies (e.g. knowledge transfer through workshops), social infrastructure (e.g. reliable partners in the refugee camp, partner from the university) and social capital (e.g. shared vision and values of all stakeholders). These important insights can be transferred on other interventions in similar unstable environments.},
    author = {Aal, Konstantin and Mouratidis, Marios and Weibert, Anne and Wulf, Volker},
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {yallah, Come\_In, Community informatics, Computer club, Refugee camp, West Bank},
    }